December 5, 2013

Bioequivalence Guidance for ANDAs Released

FDA.bmpFDA issued a draft guidance Wednesday that provides its recommendations for generic-drug makers seeking to show bioequivalence to a reference listed drug. The document--Bioequivalence Studies with Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs Submitted Under an ANDA--does not represent a significant change or shift in FDA policy/opinion, but it covers many approaches and revises and replaces parts of two existing FDA Guidances (see here and here). And, most notably perhaps, the document is a consolidation of many of FDA's previous opinions and guidances on establishing bioequivalence that concludes with an attachment providing a summary of general approaches for the design and data handling of bioequivalence studies with pharmacokinetic endpoints. The document should provide would-be generic-drug applicants with a good starting place.

FDA's advice is very general, as the Agency states that companies should see FDA's product-specific guidances for information on individual drugs. But despite the lack of product-specific advice, the guidance provides significant detail about common study parameters. FDA starts with a general discussion of how best to establish bioequivalence. The Agency notes that applicants can establish bioequivalence using in vivo and/or in vitro methods, which include--in descending order of preference--pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, clinical, and in vitro studies.

Regarding pharmacokinetic studies, FDA suggests that applicants use: (1) a two-period, two-sequence, two-treatment, single-dose, crossover-study design; (2) a single-dose-parallel-study design; or (3) a replicate-study design. To establish bioequivalence from the studies, FDA urges applicants to use the average bioequivalence method of analysis. The guidance provides that, if possible, the study population should consist of enough subjects--18 years and older and representative of the entire population, considering age, sex, and race--to provide adequate statistical power.

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December 4, 2013

23andMe Suspends Access to Health-Related Information

23andme.jpg23andMe, the Google-backed direct-to-consumer genetic testing provider, has suspended its health-related genetic testing in response to FDA's November 22, 2013 Warning Letter. In the Warning Letter, FDA directed 23andMe to "immediately discontinue marketing [its Saliva Collection Kit and Personal Genome Service, "PGS"] until such time as it receives FDA marketing authorization for the device." While 23andMe will discontinue access to health-related services, 23andMe will continue to provide access to raw genomic data as well as ancestry-related applications. Also, customers who purchased 23andMe prior to FDA's Warning Letter will still have access to health-related results.

The Warning Letter deemed the PGS a medical device under Section 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act ("FD&C Act"). 21 U.S.C. 321(h). Section 201(h) defines a medical device as "an instrument, apparatus, implement, machine, contrivance, implant, in vitro reagent, or other similar or related article" that is "intended for use in the diagnosis of disease or other conditions, or in the cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease" or is "intended to affect the structure or any function of the body." FDA determined that the PGS fell within this definition, because it was marketed as providing, "health reports on 254 diseases and conditions." In particular, 23andMe was marketed as a "first step in prevention" for diseases like diabetes, coronary heart disease, and breast cancer.

FDA is particularly concerned about the "potential health consequences that could result from false positive or false negative assessments for high-risk indications." For example, a false positive BRCA-related risk assessment [A BRCA mutation is a mutation in either of the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. Harmful mutations in these genes produce a hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome in affected families.] Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are uncommon, and breast cancer is relatively common, so these mutations consequently account for only five to ten percent of all breast cancer cases in women.[may lead to unnecessary prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention. On the other hand, a false negative may lead to a failure to appreciate actual risk. FDA was also concerned about drug response assessments, such as warfarin sensitivity or clopidogrel response. For example, a false positive BRCA-related risk assessment [a BRCA mutation is a mutation in either of the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 that is associated with a hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome in affected families] may lead to unnecessary prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention.

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December 3, 2013

FTC Biosimilar (Follow-On Biologics) Workshop Next Week on Naming Proposals and Competition

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for dna.jpg[Update: The Workshop was cancelled on December 10, 2013, due to weather-related closure of the federal government. On December 30, 2013, FTC announced the Workshop would be held on February 4, 2014, at the FTC Conference Center at 601 New Jersey Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C. and will be webcast. FTC will publish an updated agenda and list of speakers. The comment period is unaffected by the rescheduling of the event, i.e., due by March 1, 2014.]

On December 10, 2013, the Federal Trade Commission ("FTC") will host a Workshop on the Competitive Impacts of State Regulations and Naming Conventions Concerning Follow-on Biologics. FDA has yet to receive its first biosimilar application filed under the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2010 ("BPCIA"). Despite this, the FTC believes that some state legislatures have already passed laws that may affect substitution of biosimilars for their referenced innovator biologic products. As a result, the FTC is concerned that these laws may deter the development of biosimilars and raise the costs for consumers without biosimilar options.

FTC's Workshop plans to cover some of the following questions:

  • How would the new state follow-on biologic substitution laws passed this year, or similar proposals pending in other states, affect the competition expected between or among biosimilar, interchangeable and reference biologic medicines?
  • What are the rationales behind new state proposals and laws for regulating follow-on biologic substitution?

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December 2, 2013

Q1 Productions Maximizing Patient, Observer & Clinical Reported Outcomes Conference

Thumbnail image for Thumbnail image for Q1 ProductionisAddressing Industry Concerns Regarding FDA Regulation and Compliance While Improving Utilization of Clinical Outcome Assessments via Increased Instrument Efficiency and Use of Innovative Technologies to Ensure FDA Label Inclusion

Clinical outcome assessments within the pharmaceutical industry provide critical data to researchers to support a variety of claims, from safety to cost effectiveness, to regulatory bodies as well as healthcare providers and third-party payers. Pharmaceutical executives are eager to maximize the use of outcome assessments, but must understand the optimal tools that will enable them to effectively collect, validate, and analyze the information gathered from patients, clinicians and proxy caregivers.

The Maximizing Patient, Observer & Clinical Reported Outcomes Conference will provide an opportunity for executives throughout the industry for high-level education and networking, blending perspectives from academia, industry-veterans, and regulatory authorities. This event will take place in Alexandria, VA on January 13-14, 2014. Sessions will cover a range of topics, including presentations highlighting various instruments that can be utilized to collect reported outcomes, as well as new applications and mobile technologies, modernizing the methods through which this information is gathered. Insightful commentary will also provide detail on validation methods, as well as techniques for working with the range of observers and with the most appropriate tools for those populations.

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November 25, 2013

Generic Drug Labeling May Include New Safety Information According to Proposed FDA Regulation

genericdrug.jpgFDA is proposing to amend its regulations to permit generic drug companies to add or strengthen safety warnings in labeling of their products on the basis of newly acquired safety information, even before the Agency has approved this safety information in the labeling of corresponding brand name drugs.

Under current rules, a generic drug must have the "same labeling" as its reference listed drug. This prevented an ANDA holder from inserting or altering a safety communication unless and until FDA has approved this information in the labeling of the brand name drug.

The purpose of the amendment is to "level the playing" field for generics, which arises from two conflicting Supreme Court decisions involving Federal preemption of safety warnings in prescription drug labeling. In Wyeth v. Levine, the Court held that a failure to warn claim in a Vermont personal injury action was not preempted by FDA labeling regulations, because the brand name drug company could have voluntarily amended its labeling to include a stronger safety warning even if FDA had not approved it. In contrast, the Court subsequently held in Pliva v. Mensing that a state failure to warn claim was preempted by FDA-approved labeling, since the generic company could not unilaterally add or strengthen its warning due to the same labeling requirement.

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November 19, 2013

Patent Troll Legislation Happens Again--Yet Another Bill

troll.jpgOnce again, legislation aimed at deterring abusive patent litigation is making headlines. The Patent Litigation Integrity Act of 2013 (S. 1612) was introduced by Senator Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, on October 30, 2013, and seeks to address patent troll litigation abuses by targeting "the economic incentives that fuel frivolous lawsuits."

Patent troll litigation is often characterized by non-practicing entities, holding patents in a shell company with very few assets, who bring baseless claims, and seek nuisance settlements. The Bill seeks to address those concerning aspects of patent troll litigation in two ways: (1) by awarding fees to the prevailing party and (2) by requiring patent trolls to post a bond sufficient to cover the accused infringer's fees.

Fees would no longer just be awarded to the prevailing party in exceptional cases at the court's discretion. In the proposed Bill, the court would be required to award fees to the prevailing party, except if the court found that the nonprevailing party's position was substantially justified or the award would be unjust. With this deterrent, the Bill hopes that patent trolls will think twice about bringing baseless claims and that defendants, knowing they will be awarded their fees if they prevail, won't be as quick to take a nuisance settlement.

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November 18, 2013

Imbruvica® (ibrutinib) Approved To Treat Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Thelymphaticsystem_2011_large.jpgOn November 13, 2013, FDA approved Imbruvica® (ibrutinib) for the treatment of patients with mantle cell lymphoma ("MCL"), a rare and aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma or blood cancer. Imbruvica® will be co-marketed by Pharmacyclics, Inc. ("Pharmacyclics") based in Sunnyvale, Calif. and Janssen Biotech, Inc. ("Janssen") based in Raritan, N.J and will be sold as a single agent oral capsule.

Imbruvica® has been approved for patients with MCL who have received at least one prior therapy and works by blocking a specific protein called Bruton's tyrosine kinase ("BTK"). Non-clinical studies have shown that blocking BTK inhibits malignant B-cell survival. The recommended dose of Imbruvica® is 560 mg (four 140 mg capsules) once daily. About six percent of all non-Hodgkin lymphoma cases in the U.S. are classified as MCL. MCL is often diagnosed in an advanced stage after it has already spread to the lymph nodes, bone marrow and other organs.

Imbruvica® was approved as part of the Breakthrough Therapy Designation ("BTD") program that facilitated its development, review, and approval. Imbruvica® was granted three BTDs by FDA, including relapsed or refractory MCL, and is the second drug with a BTD to receive FDA approval.

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November 14, 2013

Biosimilar Enbrel® Court Challenge First Test of BPCIA?

dna.jpgYears have passed since enactment of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 ("BCPIA"), and we have been waiting for developments--from government, industry, and/or law--that would spark life into the biosimilars' industry. But, with FDA taking a wait-and-see approach, industry unwilling to act without more FDA guidance, and the courts not having any cases to decide, progress on the biosimilars' front has been slow.

Some of that may change though after a judicial decision coming out of the Northern District of California this week. There, Judge Maxine Chesney nixed Sandoz's early challenge to two Hoffman-La Roche ("Roche") patents covering etanercept, a human tumor necrosis factor receptor. Amgen, the exclusive licensee of the patents, claims they cover its Enbrel® product. Sandoz, who is currently conducting clinical trials to test an etanercept product, stated that once the trials were complete, it intended to file an application for licensure of its etanercept product as biosimilar to Enbrel®. Accordingly, Sandoz sought a declaration that its claimed biosimilar product did not infringe either patent, and that both patents were invalid and unenforceable.

Sandoz contended that declaratory relief was appropriate, because it had provided notice of commercial marketing. In opposition, Roche and Amgen made two related arguments: (1) the district court did not have standing to consider the patent dispute, because Sandoz had not yet submitted an application to FDA and (2) there was no cognizable case or controversy. The court agreed with Roche and Amgen, finding a number of problems with Sandoz's position.

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November 13, 2013

Compounding Pharmacy Bill Advances in Senate (Updated Again - Signed Into Law)

mortar and pestle.jpg

[Update: After unanimously passing the Senate on November 18, 2013, H.R. 3204--the Drug Quality and Security Act--is set to become law after an expected signature from President Obama. President Obama signed into law on November 27, 2013.]


On November 12, 2013, the Senate voted to close debate on and advance a compounding pharmacy bill--H.R. 3204--aimed at tightening government oversight of pharmacy compounding and creating a national tracking system for prescription drugs. The 97-1 vote indicated overwhelming bipartisan support for the proposal, which passed the House in September. The lone dissenter, Sen. David Vitter, objected to a final Senate vote on the proposal because he wanted the Senate to first vote on a measure that he proposed to require lawmakers to disclose which of their aides are signing up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act and which are remaining in the Federal Employee Benefit Program.

Originally introduced in the House by Rep. Fred Upton, H.R. 3204--the Drug Quality and Security Act--seeks to address two major concerns regarding the safety and quality of the U.S. drug supply. First, and in response to last year's deadly meningitis outbreak, the Bill seeks to strengthen government oversight of compounding pharmacies. More specifically, Title I--the Compounding Quality Act--would amend the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act ("FD&C Act") as to the regulation of compounding pharmacies, which have historically been regulated by state pharmacy boards. Under the proposal, pharmacies that perform traditional, small-scale compounding will continue to be regulated by state pharmacy boards. Additionally, drugs compounded by or under the direct supervision of a licensed pharmacist in a facility can elect to register as an outsourcing facility. In doing so, these drugs would be exempt from the FD&C Act's labeling, new-drug, and proposed track-and-trace requirements if certain conditions were met, including: (1) proper registration of the facility; (2) no compounding using bulk drug substances; (3) compounding with ingredients that comply with applicable standards; (4) no compounding of drugs that have been withdrawn or removed due to lack of safety or efficacy; (5) no compounding of drugs that are essentially a copy of one or more approved drugs; (6) no compounding of drugs that have been identified as ones that present demonstrable difficulties for compounding; (7) no sale or transfer of the compounded drug by any entity other than the outsourcing facility; and (8) appropriate labeling.

The Bill also seeks to increase protection of the prescription-drug supply chain. More specifically, Title II--the Drug Supply Chain Security Act--will establish requirements to establish a track-and-trace system that will follow prescription drugs from manufactures to retail pharmacies. This national system should facilitate greater protection against counterfeiting, earlier detection of possible drug shortages, simpler recalls of defective drugs, and other drug supply-chain issues. While there will be certain waivers and exemptions, the proposal would require drugmakers to affix a product identifier on each package and case of product intended to be introduced in a transaction into commerce. Ten years after enactment, the Bill adds an electronic-tracing requirement. The Bill will require FDA to publish guidelines: (1) establishing standards for the interoperable exchange of transaction information, transaction history, and transaction statements; and (2) establishing the process by which companies may obtain waivers, exceptions, and/or exemptions to the product-identifier requirements. The national track-and-trace program will also preempt all state and local requirements regarding tracing drugs through the supply channels.

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November 12, 2013

Aptiom® (Eslicarbazepine Acetate) Approved for Partial-Onset Seizures

epilepsy.jpgOn November 8, 2013, FDA approved Aptiom® (eslicarbazepine acetate), manufactured by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals ("Sunovion"), as a once-daily, immediate-release, adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures associated with epilepsy in adults 18 years or older. Partial or localized seizures affect only part of the brain at onset and are the most common type of seizure in epilepsy patients. Seizures can cause a wide range of symptoms, including repetitive limb movements, unusual behavior, and generalized convulsions with loss of consciousness and can have serious consequences, including injury and death. Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders affecting nearly 2.2 million people in the U.S.

Aptiom® is an oral drug that stabilizes the inactive state of voltage-gated sodium channels and blocks T-type voltage-gated calcium channels. Sunovion recommends treatment using 400 mg once daily initially for one week followed by a dosage increase to a recommended maintenance dosage of 800 mg once daily. The maximum recommended maintenance dosage is 1,200 mg once daily. FDA noted that existing treatments do not achieve satisfactory seizure control from existing treatments. Sunovion, the U.S.-based unit of the Japanese drug maker Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma Co., expects Aptiom® to be available in U.S. pharmacies in the second quarter of 2014. FDA did not classify Aptiom® as a controlled substance.

Sunivion submitted Aptiom® for approval based on three, large phase 3 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, safety and efficacy trials that included more than 1,400 patients with partial-onset seizures inadequately controlled by one to three concomitant, antiepileptic drugs, including carbamazepine, lamotrigine, valproic acid, and levetiracetam. These trials, jointly performed with BIAL-Portela & Ca, S.A. ("BIAL"), demonstrated a statistically-significant reduction in standardized seizure frequency compared to placebo. Significantly more treated patients had a seizure frequency reduction of 50% or more from baseline (41% compared to 22%).

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November 11, 2013

Partially Hydrogenated Oils Tentatively No Longer GRAS

transfat.jpgFDA has tentatively found that partially hydrogenated oils ("PHOs"), the primary dietary source of trans fatty acids, are no longer generally regarded as safe ("GRAS"). While PHOs are used in a number of food products (e.g. margarine, shortening, and baked goods), they have been linked to significant health risks, such as coronary heart disease. FDA's tentative determination that PHOs are no longer GRAS means that PHOs would now be classified as "food additives," subject to Section 409 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act ("FD&C Act") (21 U.S.C. 348). FDA does not allow food manufacturers to sell food additives, directly or indirectly, without prior approval for us by FDA.

The FD&C Act defines a "food additive" as "any substance the intended use of which results or may reasonably be expected to result, directly or indirectly, in its becoming a component or otherwise affecting the characteristics of any food...." 21 U.S.C. 321(s). Except that GRAS substances are not considered food additives. A substance is GRAS if it is generally recognized to be safe under the conditions of its proposed use "among experts qualified by scientific training and experience to evaluate its safety, as having been adequately shown through scientific procedures." In addition, if the substance had been used in food before January 1, 1958, it could be considered GRAS based on experience form its "common use" in food. However, even common use in food cannot overcome new evidence demonstrating that a consensus no longer exists that the substance is safe.

While some GRAS substances are listed in the regulations, there is no comprehensive list of GRAS substances. With the passage of the Food Additives Amendment to the FD&C Act in 1958, FDA established a list of GRAS substances. And in 1972, FDA instituted a notice-and-rulemaking procedure for affirming certain substances as GRAS. However, in 1997, FDA instituted a voluntary notification program for GRAS substances, which does not require notice-and-comment rulemaking. Thus, in many cases, food manufacturers and users have been responsible for determining whether substances are GRAS in light of the views of experts. For example, partially hydrogenated soybean oil and partially hydrogenated cottonseed oil were considered GRAS based on common use prior to 1958, but are not listed as GRAS in any FDA regulation.

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November 8, 2013

Korea-Maryland USA Bio Expo Held in Rockville, Maryland Last Week

Korea-MD, USA Bio Expo Opening Ceremonies.JPGOn November 7 and 8, 2013, FLH attorneys Brian J. Malkin, Charlie J. Raubicheck, and Scot B. Pittman attended and participated as sponsors of the 3rd Annual Korea-Maryland, USA Bio Expo. The Expo hosted leading Korean pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device companies at the Universities at Shady Grove Conference Center in Rockville, Maryland. The event provided networking opportunities and seminars from industry professionals with the goal to encourage collaboration of Korean biotechnology businesses utilizing the resources in the Washington, D.C. area.

The opening ceremonies featured presentations by a variety of local and Korean representatives committed to helping Korean business set up operations in the United States, particularly Maryland, and specifically Montgomery County. The speakers included:


  1. Ambassador for Green Growth & Environment, Kyungryul An

  2. Embassy of the Republic of Korea, Consul-General Do-ho Kang

  3. Maryland Secretary of State, John P. McDonough

  4. BioMaryland Center Executive, Director Judy Britz

  5. Montgomery County Executive, Isiah Leggett

  6. Montgomery County Department of Economic Development Director, Steve Silverman

  7. Hanbat National University Graduate School, Dean Byung Wook Ahn

  8. George Washington University, Department Chair of East Asian Languages and Literatures Young-Key Kim-Renaud.

The Maryland representatives highlighted some of the advantages for doing business in Maryland. For example, Maryland offers income tax credits equal to 50% of an eligible investment for investors in Qualified Maryland Biotechnology Companies ("QMBCs"). This tax credit program offers incentives for investment in seed and early stage, biotech companies, up to $250,000. To qualify, companies are required to: be less than 15 years old; have their headquarters and base of operations in Maryland; employ fewer than 50 people, and have a valid certification from the Department of Business and Economic Development ("DBED"). Investors are required to submit applications prior to making an investment. DBED reviews the applications and issues initial credit certifications within 30 calendar days.(http://www.choosemaryland.org/businessresources/pages/biotechnologyinvestmenttaxcredit.aspx ). Chevy Chase, Maryland also is home to a branch of NEA, one of the country's largest venture capital funds, with the potential to help support Maryland businesses such as those in the biotechnology field.

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November 7, 2013

GPhA's Fall Technical Conference Delivers Messages of GDUFA, Quality, and More - Day 2

gpha-headerLogo.gifDay 2 of the Generic Pharmaceutical Association ("GPhA's") annual Fall Technical Conference focused on RTR issues, FDA's efforts to update the inactive ingredient database, stability, Uhl's OGD update, and closing remarks.Some of the key take aways for RTRs is that once year three of GDUFA kicks in, FDA will take a closer look at RTR issues such as DMFs, which need to be accepted for referencing rather than just filed prior to the ANDA. In the past, many sponsors had filed their ANDAs close in time--and sometime simultaneously--with the ANDA to prevent competitors and referenced drug holders alike from suspecting their ANDA filing in advance of a patent challenge notice. Now FDA is recommending that DMFs be filed at least six months in advance to permit a completeness assessment for filing. FDA's recommendation is based on an observation that it typically takes between two to five months for DMF holders to address submission deficiencies.

Johnny Young, M.A.L.A., Regulatory Health Project Manager, OGD, explained that OGD has been viewing excipients more critically than before, e.g., ophthalmic drugs need to be Q/Q even though the current regulations provide certain exceptions, based on what has been learned. Young also noted that there are new microbiology and stability requirements for ANDA that may also lead to RTRs, and he recommended that industry take a careful look at the new RTR guidance as well as ANDA checklist, which is regularly updated. Representing industry's viewpoint, Robert Pollock, M.S., R.Ph., Senior Advisor and Member of the Board, Lachman Consultant Services, Inc. said that the proposed five-day turn around to remedy a RTR prior to its issuance (from the current 10-day scheme) may prove to be difficult for industry to meet. Pollock also thought that it would be important for ANDA applicants to submit higher-quality ANDAs at the onset rather than hoping to fix them later, even when there is a rush to be the first patent challenger for 180-day exclusivity, because a RTR could remove that incentive.

During a question-and-answer period, FDA explained that its new RTR guidance put into writing many of the policies it had been following, so not that much in it was particularly new. Ian Margand, R.Ph., Regulatory Support Management, OGD, explained that for GDUFA to work, ANDA applicants have to take a greater responsibility for their DMF holders. In particular, ANDA applicants need to provide time for their DMF holders to provide an adequate DMF for their ANDA to be filed. Regarding labeling carve-outs to attempt to avoid certain Orange Book-listed patents with method-of-use claims or unexpired exclusivity, Young said that like other RTR issues, FDA will provide ANDA applicants with five days to fix prior to receiving an RTR, if the carve out is not in line with the Agency's expectations of appropriate carve outs.

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November 6, 2013

GPhA's Fall Technical Conference Delivers Messages of GDUFA, Quality, and More - Day 1

gpha-headerLogo.gifOn October 29-30, 2013, the Generic Pharmaceutical Association ("GPhA") held its annual Fall Technical Conference that featured a Keynote by Director, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research ("CDER"), Janet Woodcock, M.D., the Acting Office of Generic Drugs ("OGD") Kathleen "Cook" Uhl, M.D., and a variety of other FDA and industry speakers. While the Conference included typical fare such as bioequivalence issues, a predominant topic was FDA's implementation of the Generic Drug User Fee Act ("GDUFA").

Starting with Woodock's Keynote, her message was OGD's reorganization, including the development of the Office of Product Quality ("OPQ") to help drive home the message that abbreviated new drug applications ("ANDAs") need to be high quality for OGD to meet its GDUFA goals. Some of the changes Woodcock spoke about included reviewing generics by dosage form by specialized groups and centralizing elements of the generics program in 2015: microbiology, project management, and a policy office with policy functions for chemistry, manufacturing, and controls, quality issues, and inspections. Woodcock described OGD as having assembled "SWAT teams" to handle specific types of ANDA applications in the backlog, noting that next year will be critical to control the backlog before GDUFA measures kick in 2015.

Next a barrage of quality presentations from FDA and industry followed, emphasizing the need to develop quality metrics, methods to develop internal audit programs to continuously monitor identified quality issues, and FDA's expectations for quality going forward. FDA said that Quality by Design ("QbD") needs to be second nature, focusing on metrics that are clinically relevant to patient safety and health. Some metrics suggested included: batch/lot failure rates (rejected, reworked), right the first time, demonstration of active pharmaceutical ingredient/excipient compatibility and stability, and standards for sampling/acceptance plans. Rather than just include passing bioequivalence studies, FDA explained that sponsors need to explain how they arrived at a bioequivalent drug product and their scale-up plans.

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November 5, 2013

Korea-Maryland, USA Bio Expo 2013 in Rockville, Maryland Later this Week

korea-MD Bio Expo.jpgOn November 6-9, 2013, the 3rd Annual Korea-Maryland, USA Bio Expo will showcase the best opportunity meet with Korea's leading pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device companies. The main show dates are November 7th and 8th at the Universities at Shady Grove Conference Center in Rockville, Maryland. Some of the major events associated with this Expo include:

  • Korea's regional officials from the Gangwondo, Jellonamdo, Kyeongsangnamdo, and Chungcheonbukdo Provinces will be in attendance.
  • Evening Reception with presentations from Korean companies and their technology development on November 7th from 6:00pm-8:30pm.
  • Seminars from industry professionals on business development and regulatory affairs including FLH's key FDA/Regulatory Partners Charles J. Raubicheck and Brian J. Malkin. Topics that will be covered on the main show dates include: (1) Investigational New Drug (IND) Process - Nonclinical, (2) Chemistry Manufacturing and Controls (CMC) Process, (3) Clinical Study Design Phase I, Phase II, Phase IIA, Phase III - Drugs, (4) Pharmacometrics and Clinical Study Design, (5) Current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) and its Role in Regulatory Drug Quality, (6) Current Drug Shortages and Orphan Drug Disease Pharmaceutical Development, (7) Innovative Strategies for New Drug Development, and (8) the Patent Process for Drug Repurposing Development.
  • Exhibitors from U.S. and Korea presenting opportunities from both countries to build collaborations.
  • General admission to the exhibition hall is free to the general public.

Frommer Lawrence & Haug LLP is proud to be a sponsor of Korea-Maryland, USA Bio Expo 2013 and looks forward to participating in this event to help make it be one of the greatest international fairs between Korea and the United States to foster mutual cooperation for the development of new pharmaceuticals, medical robotics technology, stem-cell research, medical devices, environmentally-friendly energy research, and additional innovations.